[UW Photo A049]

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[UW Photo A049]


[UW Photo A048] Dramatic lines

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[UW Photo A048] Dramatic lines



Apart from shipwrecks what else we should present in B&W in underwater photography. This is a question I am thinking again and again. I very much prefer B&W in land photography, particularly when it comes to portraits. I though this photo would give little bit of abstract feeling when remove the diverse colours to emphasise the rhythm of lines.

[UW Photo A049] Right time, Right place, But poor conditions..

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[UW Photo A049] Right time, Right place, But poor conditions..


I made a significant effort on shooting sharks this summer. Summer is almost gone without any fruit!
Usually, we find its hard to find the subject… but this time I was lucky with it. I found sharks in two occasions.. right time, right place.. BUT water condition was so unfriendly. Poor visibility and muddy water.. so this is the worst nightmare for a underwater photographer.
These photos are best examples of photos taken in bad condition.. not only you cant see the details, but light (flash) has been backskattering. So this is the proofs of failure in this season..
These are Grey Nurse Sharks. Usually they are not aggressive by nature.

[UW Photo A047] Green instead of Blue

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[UW Photo A047] Green instead of Blue

 
Any underwater photographer would prefer to shoot in crystal clear tropical waters, though there are many different regions. This is an example of photo taken in temperate zone. Main difference is dominance of Green instead of Blue. Its actually a difficult exercise due to many reasons. Biggest constrain is poor visibility. Still there are some unique fauna you could notice in those areas, though diversity is obviously less than tropical coral reefs. Famous photographer Shannon Conway advises you on changing the mind set from blue to green when you shoot in temperate zones.
 
This school of fish was captured near Broughton Island of Nelson Bay, about 200km north of Sydney. In poor visibility this is the best I could capture.

[UW Photo A046] Clownfish at Great Barrier Reef

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[UW Photo A046] Clownfish at Great Barrier Reef


This is a Clownfish (anemonefish) captured in outer reef of Great Barrier Reef. They are significantly colourful and magnificent fishes.

By doing “Finding Nemo” movie, it was expected to convey the message opposing the hobby of keeping captured reef fishes. Ironically, it affected adversely since more people wanted to keep clown fishes in their aquariums all around the world. Now it has been a threat to the survival of different species of clownfishes.

[UW Photo A045] Sex changing Wrasse

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[UW Photo A045] Sex changing Wrasse



Wrasse is one of the few fish species that can change their sex during the life time. The dominant male is removed/died, it is said that a suitable female get that place with a sex change.
Colour pattern of the eye of this fish indicates it is in the process of such a sex change.

[UW Photo A044] Spotted Wobbegong

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[UW Photo A044] Spotted Wobbegong



This is an attempt of getting an macro shot of Spotted Wobbegong (Orectolobus maculatus) in Magic Point, Sydney. Wobbegongs are kinds of Carpet Sharks. Though it is advised to shoot upwards, it is not practical when shooting a creature who is in the sea bed mostly. This is not bad as a try, but it could have been improved with more concentration.

[UW Photo A043]

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[UW Photo A043]


[UW Photo A042] A start fish

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[UW Photo A042] A start fish



Good thing about this photo is clarity of water (less particles in between lens and subject) which desn't result backscattering. Backscattering is the worst nightmare for underwater shooting. In fact, clear water gives you the advantage of improving the quality by increasing the contrast and etc.

This photo shows the direction where sunlight coming from. In underwater photography it is advised to shoot in a direction where sun is behind you. This gives more light directly to subject. Anyway, it’s not practical in all the occasions.

[UW Photo A041]

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[UW Photo A041]



Though nothing special about this photo, I like the two uncommon colours contrasting each other. Texture of Coral too seems very different.

[UW Photo A040] : A Solitary Bannerfish

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[UW Photo A040] : A Solitary Bannerfish


[UW Photo A039] : Adding the “human factor”

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[UW Photo A039] : Adding the “human factor”



I am very reluctant to add “humans” to a photograph taken beneath the sea. It gives me the feeling of blending the nature with artificial elements. Anyway, taking a photo with a man (i.e. Diver) is the only way of giving an idea about the size of an object in underwater photography. In that respect, there is no alternative. This technique is ideally used in capturing ship wrecks, where size matters. Here I have done the same in this image.  I waited till other two divers of my team go closer to the right position. Ship wrecks are also well-illustrated in black and white view.

This is famous Conch wreck in Hikkaduwa (Close to Akurala). Arthur C. Clarke and Mike Wilson have explored this wreck in their heydays of explorations.

Anyway, please note that I have used a wide angle lens so the objects get smaller when deviating from the center. In fact, divers are shown very small.

[UW Photo A038] : A Sea Slug (nudibranch)

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[UW Photo A038] : A Sea Slug (nudibranch)



Sea slugs are simply explained as saltwater snails without a shell (or with an internal shell). There are no many researches done about them. Anyway, they should be playing a significant role in the ecosystem of a coral reef.

This bright yellow colored slug (Notodoris minor) was captured in Great Barrier Reef.

[UW Photo A037] Many fishes

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[UW Photo A037] Many fishes



Most of the seascapes we see in magazines with thousands of fish in blue water have been captured using wide angle lenses. This is same kind of attempt I made. Kiralagala in Hikkaduwa is one such site that provides a plenty of opportunity for wide angle photos. It got different rock formations that give many options supported by many kinds of fishes.

[UW Photo A036] Dull yellow

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[UW Photo A036] Dull yellow



When I capture this, I was equipped with a simple point and shoot camera. So I had to shoot everything in the same manner. Obviously, this is a macro opportunity. Anyhow, today very sophisticated point and shoot camera housings are capable of changing lenses underwater, which are called “wet lenses”.

I like this dull yellow colour for some reason. Mostly I like the expression of small yellow fish within the corals, yet I can’t identify the exact species.

[UW Photo A035] Capture from Unawatuna

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[UW Photo A035] Capture from Unawatuna


[UW Photo A034] A seascape

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[UW Photo A034] A seascape


This sight reminded me of bird nest plants within the vegetation of a rain forest. If I am equipped with a wide angle lens I could have captured this better. That would have supported me to go closer to capture more details, without restricting the range. This capture is from the outer reef of Great Barrier Reef.

[UW Photo A033] An abstract

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[UW Photo A033] An abstract


Usually, underwater photographers don’t pay much attention on shooting abstracts. Still, underwater ecosystem gives marvellous opportunities for such initiations. Famous photographer, Martin Edge explains fundamentals of training one’s eye to capture abstracts. He also encourages shooting them.
This is one of my attempts to capture a portion of a sea fan coral with the contrast of blue water.

[UW Photo A031] A closer look

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[UW Photo A031] A closer look


[UW Photo A030] Lionfish portrait

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[UW Photo A030] Lionfish portrait


This lionfish is posed perfectly. Shot could have been improved by moving closer or using a macro.

[UW Photo A029] Corals on wreck

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[UW Photo A029] Corals on wreck


[UW Photo A028] Scorpionfish

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[UW Photo A028] Scorpionfish


This is Scorpionfish. It’s interesting to know, how cleverly it camouflage itself according to the surrounding. Though it is not an aggressive fish, it is always advised to keep a safe distance because its’ erectile spines of their dorsal, pelvic and anal fins contains poison.

Of course this is not a very good shot. Though, this is best captured as a macro shot, still it could have been captured better with wide angle gear if I had bit more patience. Simply, I should have waited bit more to capture the "peak of action" than shooting the resting animal.

[UW Photo A027] Fusiliers at Conch

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[UW Photo A027] Fusiliers at Conch


School of Yellowback fusiliers seen within the ship wreck, The Conch, which is more than 100 years old.

[UW Photo A026] Corals on the rock

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[UW Photo A026] Corals on the rock


When visibility was too poor, you still have little chance of shooting different corals. This is a coral grown on the rocky surface of Kadawara Gala.

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